Landing Page Vs Homepage 2024: What is the Difference?

Many people use the terms “landing page” and “homepage” interchangeably, but they are actually two very different things.

Your homepage is the page that people see when they first visit your website, while your landing page is a specific page that you create to get people to take the desired action, such as signing up for your email list.

An example of a landing page would be a page that asks a person to sign up for a free trial of a product.

An example for the homepage would be the website’s main page, which typically contains a banner image, links to the most important pages on the website, and a menu bar.

The homepage is also where you’ll usually find information about the company or organization that owns the website.

In this definitive guide on landing pages vs homepage, we’ll take a closer look at the differences between landing pages and homepages so that you can decide on which one to use where and which one is right for your business.

What is a Homepage?

Homepage landing page vs homepage

As we mentioned before, a homepage is the first page that people see when they visit your website.

It should give visitors an overview of what your website is about and what they can expect to find on it.

Your homepage should also be easy to navigate so that people can easily find the information or product they’re looking for.

Some homepages also have a search bar so that people can directly search for what they need.

Your homepage should also be visually appealing and contain relevant images and videos, and of course, the loading speed of the homepage matters as well.

What is a Landing Page?

Landing page landing page vs homepage

A landing page is a specific page on your website that’s designed to get people to take the desired action, such as signing up for your email list or buying a product.

Landing pages are usually standalone pages that are not linked to your website’s menu bar or navigation.

This is because they’re meant to be a single-focused experience that is separate from the rest of your website.

Landing pages are typically used to promote a specific product or service, and they often have a form for people to enter their contact information in order to sign up for a free trial or demo.

Landing pages are an important part of any marketing strategy since they allow you to capture the contact information of potential customers and begin building a relationship with them.

In a nutshell, the sole purpose of a landing page is to save the willpower of potential customers and help them take a single decision.

When to Use a Homepage?

Your homepage should be the foundation of your website.

It’s the first page people will see when they visit your site, so it’s important to make a good impression.

Your homepage should give visitors an overview of what your website is about and what they can expect to find on it.

Think of your homepage as the starting point for your website.

It should be easy to navigate so that people can easily find the information they’re looking for.

If you have a blog, your homepage should feature your latest blog posts.

And if you have an eCommerce store, your homepage should showcase your top-selling products.

In short, your homepage should be a general overview of your entire website and should be used to give people a starting point for their journey through your site.

When to Use a Landing Page?

Landing pages are a more specific type of page on your website.

They’re focused on getting visitors to take a certain action, such as signing up for your email list or buying a product.

Landing pages should be standalone pages that aren’t linked to the navigation bar of your website.

This is because they’re meant to be a single-focused experience that’s separate from the rest of your website.

Some examples of when you would use a landing page include promoting a new product, running a special offer or sale, or collecting contact information for leads.

If you have a specific goal in mind for your website, such as getting people to sign up for your email list or buying a product, then a landing page is the best way to achieve that goal.

In general, it’s best to use a homepage for more general content and navigation, while using landing pages for specific desired actions.

However, there are certain instances where you may want to use a homepage in place of a landing page.

For example, if you have a very simple website with no blog or e-commerce store, then your homepage may be the best option for promoting specific products or services.

The Difference Between Homepage and Landing Page

When it comes to marketing your business online, one of the most important decisions you have to make is whether to use a landing page or a homepage.

While both can be effective in their own right, they each have distinct advantages and disadvantages that must be considered before choosing which type of page to use.

At its core, a landing page is a standalone web page that is designed for a specific purpose.

This could be anything from promoting a product or service to generating leads for your business.

Landing pages are usually very focused on their design and copy, and they typically have one primary call-to-action (CTA) that the visitor is meant to take.

On the other hand, a homepage is the main page of your website that visitors will typically see when they first arrive.

Homepages are generally much more general in nature and provide an overview of what your business is all about. They also typically have multiple links to other pages on your site, as opposed to just one CTA.

What Makes a Homepage Great?

The average internet user spends around 52 seconds on a given webpage before moving on, considering the page is worth reading and satisfies the intent of the user (Source).

With that in mind, it’s essential that your homepage is designed to make a great first impression and keep people engaged.

Here are some key elements that every great homepage should have:

  • A clear and concise headline that tells visitors what your site is all about and what you can offer them.
  • Easy navigation and a clear hierarchy, so that visitors don’t have to spend time hunting around for what they’re looking for.
  • Visual elements like images or videos help to break up the text and provide visual interest.
  • Calls to action that encourage users to engage with your site, whether that’s by subscribing to your newsletter, downloading a free e-book, or making a purchase.
  • Social proof in the form of testimonials or customer reviews, to build trust and show that others have had positive experiences with your site.

Each of these elements can be instrumental in helping to convince visitors that your site is worth their time.

With that out of the way, let’s look at some of the real-life examples of what a phenomenal homepage looks like.

Best Homepage Examples

1. Airbnb

Airbnb scaled landing page vs homepage

One of the best examples of a homepage done right is Airbnb. 

They’re presented with clear navigation options at the top of the page to help them find exactly what they’re looking for.

And if they have any questions or need assistance, there is a clearly visible contact form at the bottom of the page to help them get in touch.

2. HubSpot

HubSpot scaled landing page vs homepage

HubSpot is another great example, as they’ve made excellent use of social proof and testimonials to build trust with potential customers.

They also have multiple calls to action on their homepage, encouraging visitors to download their free e-book or take a tour of their product.

3. Amazon

Amazon scaled landing page vs homepage

Amazon is the perfect example of a homepage that is designed to increase conversions.

They’ve managed to pack a lot of information onto their homepage without making it feel cluttered or overwhelming. 

And, most importantly, they have several prominent calls to action that are impossible to miss, such as signing up for their Prime membership or making a purchase.

As you can see, there’s no one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to deciding whether to use a landing page or homepage.

Your decision depends on your business goals and the audience you’re targeting.

However, one thing’s for sure – if you want to create a truly great homepage that keeps visitors engaged and coming back for more, there are certain elements you need to focus on.

So start brainstorming the key features of your ideal homepage today, and get ready to start converting those visitors into customers!

What Makes a Landing Page Great?

A great landing page is designed with one primary goal in mind: to convert visitors into customers.

Unlike your homepage, which is meant to give website visitors an overview of your business and what you have to offer, a landing page focuses entirely on making that all-important conversion.

In order to achieve this goal, a landing page typically contains just one call to action, is optimized for mobile, and has a clear and concise headline that tells visitors exactly what your product or service is all about.

Other key elements of a great landing page include easy navigation, visual interest through the use of images or videos, and social proof in the form of testimonials from previous customers.

Best Landing Page Examples

1. Uber

Uber landing page scaled landing page vs homepage

Uber does an excellent job of creating a landing page that is both informative and visually appealing.

The use of images and videos helps to break up the text and keep visitors engaged, while the clear call to action encourages them to sign up for the service.

2. Dropbox

Dropbox landing page scaled landing page vs homepage

Dropbox also does a great job of combining visual interest with clear and concise text.

Each section of the page highlights key features of their product, such as an intuitive user interface or unlimited storage space.

And they make it easy for visitors to get in touch if they have any questions or need help signing up.

3. Shopify

Shopify landing page scaled landing page vs homepage

Shopify is another great example of a landing page that succeeds in making the sign-up process easy and seamless.

By providing an interactive tool to help visitors build their online store, Shopify helps its customers visualize exactly how their business will look once it’s launched.

Overall, there are many different factors to consider when creating a great landing page, but the key is to keep your visitors engaged and focused on making that all-important conversion. 

Landing Page Vs Homepage: The Bottom Line

When it comes to deciding whether to use a landing page or a homepage, the answer really depends on your business goals and the audience you’re targeting.

A landing page is typically best for businesses that are looking to generate leads or sales, while a homepage is better suited to giving potential customers an overview of your brand and what you have to offer.

That said, there are certain key elements that every successful landing page and homepage should have in common.

These include clear and concise text, easy navigation, visual interest through the use of images or videos, and social proof in the form of testimonials from previous customers.

Hopefully, this guide has helped you better understand the key differences between a landing page and a homepage and gives you some ideas for creating your own high-converting online presence.

So start building your perfect landing page or homepage today, and start seeing real results!

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